Medical

Addiction And Substance Abuse Are Not Disconnected

Summary

  Obsessions are characterized by compulsive involvement in behaviors repeated over time, despite increasing personal and professional harm to self and others, resulting in marked and often permanent impairment. According to the Mayo Clinic, addiction is a “complex disorder, which […]

 

Obsessions are characterized by compulsive involvement in behaviors repeated over time, despite increasing personal and professional harm to self and others, resulting in marked and often permanent impairment. According to the Mayo Clinic, addiction is a “complex disorder, which can last for years, even decades” and result from a “loss of control over behavior.” Symptoms of addiction include use of illegal drugs/alcohol. Physical Dependence: Physical dependency on a drug is the most obvious form of addiction. The physical dependence on drugs typically includes the need to take the medication regularly, through different methods (oral, intravenous, inhalation, etc. ), through dosage change, and in some cases, through changes in personal routines (e.g., watching TV instead of exercising).

Psychological Dependence: A psychological addiction is manifested through patterns of thought and behavior over time. For example, an individual may experience a long history of abuse of one substance (e.g., cocaine) and begin using another (e.g., alcohol). This is called a “transitional” addiction because the sense being used (e.g., alcohol) was previously the source of distress (e.g., being fired from a job, experiencing low grades, etc.). Individuals may experience psychological addictions when they try to stop taking the substance (e.g., they attempt to stop drinking alcohol and don’t achieve success).

Brain Structural Problems: Different areas of the brain receive increased stimulation when the substance of choice is present (i.e., during the processing of memories). Over time, repeated exposure to the addictive substance alters the brain’s areas responsible for regulating behavior, prompting the need to become addicted. Brain scans demonstrate that these areas (frontal, parietal, and occipital) become hyperactive and depressed as the brain tries to compensate for its inability to process substance-related information. This brain change is similar to the effect that chronic nicotine use has on the brain’s cortices, responsible for controlling attention. The result is that people with substance addictions find it difficult to keep their brains “on track.”

Physical Dependence: Physical addiction is the result of physical dependence, usually due to repeated abuse or excessive use. The continued presence of a substance distinguishes it after periods of recovery (e.g., the patient did not smoke for several weeks but begins to smoke after receiving a prescription for codeine pain reliever). As with psychological addiction, individuals may experience physical habits if they attempt to stop consuming a substance (e.g., they try to stop smoking but fail multiple times). This type of dependency is recognized by the presence of withdrawal symptoms (e.g., shaking, nausea).

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Behavioral: The most common form of addiction treatment is cognitive-behavioral therapy. The treatment focuses on controlling behavior and thoughts (the foundation of addiction). Online pharmacy forum The goals include improving self-control, decreasing risky behavior, decreasing relapse, and improving interpersonal relationships. A majority of treatment programs utilize one of three approaches to this: either individual counseling, family counseling, or group counseling. While this approach addresses many of the psychological and physical factors involved with substance abuse, it does not address the underlying behavioral issues.

Psychological Factors: Psychological factors cannot be removed entirely from addiction. However, treatment can be significantly improved by addressing the issues that lead to substance abuse. For example, smoking is a symptom of an underlying psychological problem. People who smoke have an environment that encourages them to continue. Suppose the setting is changed, for example, by removing cigarettes from the area where they are used. In that case, they will usually try to give up their addiction without experiencing as much difficulty as those who smoke in an environment that is not familiar to them. Therefore, merely removing cigarettes from a domain is not always sufficient to provide long-term treatment.

Addiction and substance abuse are intertwined because the brain chemistry of the addict has been compromised. It is not possible to remove a substance from the mind of an addicted person. However, treatments are available that help individuals strengthen their neural-circuitry and learn new skills to manage their addictive behaviors. These treatment programs work to improve the brain’s overall functioning to ensure that substance addicts do not return to their drug of choice when their addictions have been treated effectively.Addiction And Substance Abuse Are Not Disconnected

Obsessions are characterized by compulsive involvement in behaviors repeated over time, despite increasing personal and professional harm to self and others, resulting in marked and often permanent impairment. According to the Mayo Clinic, addiction is a “complex disorder, which can last for years, even decades” and result from a “loss of control over behavior.” Symptoms of addiction include use of illegal drugs/alcohol, seeking treatment for symptoms | addiction | treatment | may | : } Physical Dependence: Physical dependency on a drug is the most obvious form of addiction. The physical dependence on drugs typically includes the need to take the medication regularly, through different methods (oral, intravenous, inhalation, etc. ), through dosage change, and in some cases, through changes in personal routines (e.g., watching TV instead of exercising).

Psychological Dependence: A psychological addiction is manifested through patterns of thought and behavior over time. For example, an individual may experience a long history of abuse of one substance (e.g., cocaine) and begin using another (e.g., alcohol). This is called a “transitional” addiction because the sense being used (e.g., alcohol) was previously the source of distress (e.g., being fired from a job, experiencing low grades, etc.). Individuals may experience psychological addictions when they try to stop taking the substance (e.g., they attempt to stop drinking alcohol and don’t achieve success).

Brain Structural Problems: Different areas of the brain receive increased stimulation when the substance of choice is present (i.e., during the processing of memories). Over time, repeated exposure to the addictive substance alters the brain’s areas responsible for regulating behavior, prompting the need to become addicted. Brain scans demonstrate that these areas (frontal, parietal, and occipital) become hyperactive and depressed as the brain tries to compensate for its inability to process substance-related information. This brain change is similar to the effect that chronic nicotine use has on the brain’s cortices, responsible for controlling attention. The result is that people with substance addictions find it difficult to keep their brains “on track.”

Physical Dependence: Physical addiction is the result of physical dependence, usually due to repeated abuse or excessive use. The continued presence of a substance distinguishes it after periods of recovery (e.g., the patient did not smoke for several weeks but begins to smoke after receiving a prescription for codeine pain reliever). As with psychological addiction, individuals may experience physical habits if they attempt to stop consuming a substance (e.g., they try to stop smoking but fail multiple times). This type of dependency is recognized by the presence of withdrawal symptoms (e.g., shaking, nausea).

Behavioral: The most common form of addiction treatment is cognitive-behavioral therapy. The treatment focuses on controlling behavior and thoughts (the foundation of addiction). The goals include improving self-control, decreasing risky behavior, decreasing relapse, and improving interpersonal relationships. A majority of treatment programs utilize one of three approaches to this: either individual counseling, family counseling, or group counseling. While this approach addresses many of the psychological and physical factors involved with substance abuse, it does not address the underlying behavioral issues.

Psychological Factors: Psychological factors cannot be removed entirely from addiction. However, treatment can be significantly improved by addressing the issues that lead to substance abuse. For example, smoking is a symptom of an underlying psychological problem. People who smoke have an environment that encourages them to continue. Suppose the setting is changed, for example, by removing cigarettes from the area where they are used. In that case, they will usually try to give up their addiction without experiencing as much difficulty as those who smoke in an environment that is not familiar to them. Therefore, merely removing cigarettes from a domain is not always sufficient to provide long-term treatment.

Addiction and substance abuse are intertwined because the brain chemistry of the addict has been compromised. It is not possible to remove a substance from the mind of an addicted person. However, treatments are available that help individuals strengthen their neural-circuitry and learn new skills to manage their addictive behaviors. These treatment programs work to improve the brain’s overall functioning to ensure that substance addicts do not return to their drug of choice when their addictions have been treated effectively.Addiction And Substance Abuse Are Not Disconnected

Obsessions are characterized by compulsive involvement in behaviors repeated over time, despite increasing personal and professional harm to self and others, resulting in marked and often permanent impairment. According to the Mayo Clinic, addiction is a “complex disorder, which can last for years, even decades” and result from a “loss of control over behavior.” Symptoms of addiction include use of illegal drugs/alcohol, seeking treatment for symptoms | addiction | treatment | may | : } Physical Dependence: Physical dependency on a drug is the most obvious form of addiction. The physical dependence on drugs typically includes the need to take the medication regularly, through different methods (oral, intravenous, inhalation, etc. ), through dosage change, and in some cases, through changes in personal routines (e.g., watching TV instead of exercising).

Psychological Dependence: A psychological addiction is manifested through patterns of thought and behavior over time. For example, an individual may experience a long history of abuse of one substance (e.g., cocaine) and begin using another (e.g., alcohol). This is called a “transitional” addiction because the sense being used (e.g., alcohol) was previously the source of distress (e.g., being fired from a job, experiencing low grades, etc.). Individuals may experience psychological addictions when they try to stop taking the substance (e.g., they attempt to stop drinking alcohol and don’t achieve success).

Brain Structural Problems: Different areas of the brain receive increased stimulation when the substance of choice is present (i.e., during the processing of memories). Over time, repeated exposure to the addictive substance alters the brain’s areas responsible for regulating behavior, prompting the need to become addicted. Brain scans demonstrate that these areas (frontal, parietal, and occipital) become hyperactive and depressed as the brain tries to compensate for its inability to process substance-related information. This brain change is similar to the effect that chronic nicotine use has on the brain’s cortices, responsible for controlling attention. The result is that people with substance addictions find it difficult to keep their brains “on track.”

Physical Dependence: Physical addiction is the result of physical dependence, usually due to repeated abuse or excessive use. The continued presence of a substance distinguishes it after periods of recovery (e.g., the patient did not smoke for several weeks but begins to smoke after receiving a prescription for codeine pain reliever). As with psychological addiction, individuals may experience physical habits if they attempt to stop consuming a substance (e.g., they try to stop smoking but fail multiple times). This type of dependency is recognized by the presence of withdrawal symptoms (e.g., shaking, nausea).

Behavioral: The most common form of addiction treatment is cognitive-behavioral therapy. The treatment focuses on controlling behavior and thoughts (the foundation of addiction). The goals include improving self-control, decreasing risky behavior, decreasing relapse, and improving interpersonal relationships. A majority of treatment programs utilize one of three approaches to this: either individual counseling, family counseling, or group counseling. While this approach addresses many of the psychological and physical factors involved with substance abuse, it does not address the underlying behavioral issues.

Psychological Factors: Psychological factors cannot be removed entirely from addiction. However, treatment can be significantly improved by addressing the issues that lead to substance abuse. For example, smoking is a symptom of an underlying psychological problem. People who smoke have an environment that encourages them to continue. Suppose the setting is changed, for example, by removing cigarettes from the area where they are used. In that case, they will usually try to give up their addiction without experiencing as much difficulty as those who smoke in an environment that is not familiar to them. Therefore, merely removing cigarettes from a domain is not always sufficient to provide long-term treatment.

Addiction and substance abuse are intertwined because the brain chemistry of the addict has been compromised. It is not possible to remove a substance from the mind of an addicted person. However, treatments are available that help individuals strengthen their neural-circuitry and learn new skills to manage their addictive behaviors. These treatment programs work to improve the brain’s overall functioning to ensure that substance addicts do not return to their drug of choice when their addictions have been treated effectively.